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UK Poised to Expand Workplace PPE Obligations

UK Poised to Expand Workplace PPE Obligations

​Employers in the United Kingdom that require personal protective equipment (PPE) on the jobsite will need to supply the health and safety gear to a broader worker population under proposed changes to the country’s 1992 law governing PPE in the workplace. The change may affect small and medium-sized employers more than large employers, legal experts predict.Companies providing PPE such as safety helmets, boots, goggles, gloves and face masks to employees will have to broaden PPE distribution to contractors.Under the Personal Protective Equipment at Work 1992 Regulations, employers have had to provide PPE only to their employees. The proposed amendments would extend the obligation to “limb (b) workers,” a U.K. worker category describing self-employed “dependent contractors” who personally provide services to other businesses. In describing a limb (b) worker, the government used the example of “Penny,” a private-hire driver working casually for “Acme Driver.” Penny can refuse work if she wants and must perform it herself if she decides to drive a customer; passengers pay Acme rather than Penny. In the U.K., individuals classified as workers generally enjoy certain rights and benefits not available to independent contractors, although fewer than full employees. The U.K.’s Health and Safety Executive in July launched a four-week public consultation on the amendments after the High Court, in a case brought by the Independent Works Union of Great Britain, ruled in 2020 that the government had long failed to properly incorporate certain relevant European Union directives into U.K. law. The amendments will cover England, Scotland and Wales.The regulations define PPE as equipment, including clothing, meant to protect a person at work against risks to their health and safety.”For most employers, the changes to the PPE at Work regulations will involve very little change, as most organizations will likely have already been providing PPE based on the nature of the role itself rather than the status of the person doing it,” said Mark Hamilton, an attorney with Dentons in Edinburgh.”Perhaps in the case of employers who largely rely on workers—for example, food delivery companies—it will be a significant logistical and financial commitment having to now provide safety equipment such as helmets to all their workers, where previously they would just have made it a condition of work that one was worn, with the worker having to supply their own,” he said.Potentially Costly ChangesMost large employers already are expected to provide tools, including PPE, to keep people safe, said Tim Hill, an attorney with Eversheds Sutherland in Newcastle, England. Apart from the PPE workplace regulation, U.K. laws for decades have required businesses to look after the health and safety of everyone on their worksites, not only employees, he added.Even before the proposed PPE legal changes, all people working on jobsites should have been provided with the necessary PPE and employers faced legal risk by not supplying it, based on the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974, Section 3, he said. That law requires businesses to protect anyone on a worksite from health and safety risks.Gig economy …

Using Technology to Prepare Workforce for Post-Pandemic Times

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Using Technology to Prepare Workforce for Post-Pandemic Times

​As the COVID-19 pandemic ebbs in India and companies prepare models for a hybrid work environment, they are looking to technology to find ways to keep a distributed workforce productive and connected. How technology has already helped in this and how else HR can put it to good use, were among the topics discussed by more than 120 speakers at the SHRM Tech 21virtual conference held by SHRM India last month.Here’s a look at a few key takeaways from the event.What CEOs Want from HR TodayThe pandemic has wrought huge change for organizations, and more change is in the cards as organizations prepare for post-pandemic times. HR can help prepare for that. “Readying the workforce for what might seem to be a very different world as we emerge from this crisis—that will be my biggest ask from HR,” said Nitin Rakesh, chief executive officer of Mphasis, an information technology-services and solutions provider in New York City.Rakesh said that organizations increasingly have new demands from employees, which means that employees need to constantly keep upgrading their skills to meet those demands. The need for upgrading roles and technological skills is not only true for Mphasis because it’s in the IT sector but also true for all companies—be they in finance or media.”Whether we know it or not, every business is a technology business today,” Rakesh said. Three-Point Approach to Support Business Growth To make an organization ready for change, Souvik Maity, employee experience & operations manager at consumer goods company Unilever in Mumbai, suggested a three-point approach. “First thing as human resources we can do is to source people who can interpret these changes that are happening presently,” Maity said. In the consumer goods industry, for instance, he said consumer behavior and buying patterns are changing. So the key would be to hire talent that can identify such trends. Once these employees are on board, the organization needs to supply them with platforms, skills and opportunities that enable them to influence the ongoing changes, in ways that favor their organization.Finally, HR should try to create an environment where its employees can influence trends that may come up in the future. “If we, as HR, are able to drive these three priorities, then I think making an organization agile—ensuring business growth—becomes easy,” Maity said. He said technology provides tools to accomplish all of these priorities. It can help identify the right talent by sifting through tens of thousands of resumes and also provide platforms for employees to become influencers.For Future Workforce, Think ‘Personas’ One big change that organizations can expect is in talent management, starting with work profiles.”Role is something that I’m starting to get concerned about. … Is there going to be a role 10 years down the line?” said Kalpana Bansal, vice president (domain head—HR platform) at conglomerate Reliance Industries Ltd in Mahrashtra. Bansal said that it’s possible that in the future there are only “value creators” who don’t fit any role or organizational structure and come in to build …

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How Managers Can Move Employees with Disabilities into Leadership

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How Managers Can Move Employees with Disabilities into Leadership

​A recent study found that employees with disabilities often believe they don’t have the same opportunities for advancement within their company as do employees without disabilities.Overall, employees with disabilities are less confident their skills will be used effectively or that their employer will trust them to use their own judgment when performing their job, according to a recent study on The State of Disability Employment Engagement by Mercer and Global Disability Inclusion. It often depends on a manager whether an employee with a disability gets the same leadership development opportunities as any other employee. “Leaders … need to look for ways to give people with disabilities opportunities to be visible in front of a group,” said PwC Tax Director Rob Rusch. “If we live in world where an individual in a wheelchair is visible, then it starts to break down that perception” that someone in a wheelchair may not be capable of performing a certain job.Here are three ways managers can provide leadership opportunities for employees with disabilities.Encourage Self-IdentificationMore companies are encouraging employees to self-identify that they have a disability, particularly if an employee has an invisible disability. People who disclose their disability are more engaged with the organization, their managers and their teams than those who have not disclosed, according to The State of Disability Employment Engagement. “I’m very comfortable identifying my disability, but I don’t have much choice because it’s an external physical disability,” said Rusch, who has a neuromuscular disability and uses a power wheelchair. Although Rusch understands that an employee with an invisible disability might not be as eager to disclose because of concerns about how a manager or co-worker could react, he doesn’t regret being open about his disability. “It has opened resources and doors for me to lean into that identity,” he said.Of the 45,078 PwC employees in 2020, 2.6 percent self-identified as having a disability, up from 1.6 percent of its 43,713 employees in 2018, according to the 2020 PwC Diversity & Inclusion Transparency Report. However, Senior Associate Nesa Mangal said, because PwC is relying on self-identification, the number of employees with disabilities is likely higher.At tech company Intel, 1.4 percent of the 110,600 employees self-identified as having a disability in 2020, said Dawn Jones, chief diversity and inclusion officer and vice president of social impact. Intel’s goal is to increase the percentage of employees who self-identify as having a disability to 10 percent of the workforce by 2030, Jones noted. “This is an important goal for us as we work toward an inclusive and psychologically safe environment where employees are empowered to bring their whole self to work and succeed,” she said.Address Inaccurate Perceptions “Because of first impressions, people with disabilities probably don’t always get the benefit of doubt that [other people] get, especially if their disability is visible,” said Paula Jenkins, a project manager and executive chef at The Galley Dining Hall in Charleston, S.C. Jenkins manages 120 employees, and about 92 percent have a disability. The Galley contracts with Palmetto Goodwill in …

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Italy Implements Mandatory Green Pass for Workers

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Italy Implements Mandatory Green Pass for Workers

​Gero Bongiorno works as the head of research and development at an industrial machinery company in Milan, which is preparing for Italy’s Green Pass for workers. As the Oct. 15 implementation date for the Green Pass approaches, Bongiorno isn’t worried about his own direct reports, who are fully vaccinated. But there are other people in the company who aren’t. Employers and Employees Prepare for Green PassItaly’s Green Pass—a domestic COVID-19 passport that indicates if someone is fully vaccinated or has tested negative for the virus in the last 72 hours—has been required at restaurants, entertainment venues and other public places, but will soon be required for any employees who are working onsite. “The employer is obliged to verify whether people working in the work environment have the Green Pass,” said Vittorio De Luca, an attorney with De Luca & Partners in Milan. Verification can be done occasionally, he said. “There must be a policy applicable in the company stating who is responsible to check how and whom, which information may and which may not be checked, and what happens in the case of [the] lack of [a] Green Pass,” De Luca said.Green Pass and PrivacyEmployees have three options to acquire a Green Pass. They can get fully vaccinated, which is the encouraged option. Otherwise, they can present a negative antigen test that allows a Green Pass for 72 hours, or they can prove that they have recently fully recovered from COVID-19. The Green Pass itself does not specify which category an employee falls under, and because of the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation, companies can’t ask. “The company cannot ask, ‘Are you vaccinated,’ or ‘Is your Green Pass active because you took the test this morning, or the PCR [polymerase chain reaction] test three days ago,’ ” Bongiorno said. The employer is free to define who is responsible to verify if employees have the Green Pass. “But the people who are in charge must be formally in charge, that must be part of a policy, [and] the policy must be communicated to the employees,” De Luca said. Even then, the people responsible for checking Green Passes can only see if the person has one, and not under what circumstances. The Green Pass app just shows “the employee can get into the company or not, no other information in the Green Pass may be subject to examination,” he said.No Green Pass, No PayThere are consequences for both employers and employees who don’t abide by the new mandatory requirements. If an employee declares that he or she does not have a Green Pass before entering the workplace, or is found to not have a Green Pass when asked, the employee will be turned away and won’t get paid until he or she gets a Green Pass.Though the vaccination is not mandatory, the use of the Green Pass and its consequences have already led to an increase in vaccinations, De Luca said. Bongiorno knows people who were persuaded by the Green Pass requirements at restaurants …

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UK Government Starts Consultation on Flexible Work

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UK Government Starts Consultation on Flexible Work

​During the last general election, the U.K. government included a manifesto pledge to make flexible work the default position unless employers have a good reason not to make it so. In 2019, the government launched the Flexible Working Taskforce—a partnership across government departments, business groups, trade unions and charities to encourage employers to consider advertising jobs at all levels and pay grades as flexible. But things had gone quiet and this commitment wasn’t included in the most recent Queen’s Speech.However, the government has now launched a consultation which sets out a number of proposals. These are built around the principle that working arrangements are best decided through dialogue between the parties. The government intends to provide, what it calls an “enabling framework” within which these conversations can take place rather than setting out specific legal requirements.The government will not change the law to allow employees a right to have flexible work. Employees will still have to initiate the discussion, as they do now, and the focus of the consultation is to support employees to start these conversations and help employers to respond to them.In other words, the government has no intention of making flexible work the default position.It has set out five specific proposals:1. Making the right to request flexible work a ‘day one’ rightCurrently employees can make a request to work flexibly under the statutory procedure only if they’ve worked for their employer for at least 26 weeks. The government believes that making flexible work available at the outset of the employment relationship will help encourage employers to consider flexible working options early in job design/recruitment process and give employees more confidence to make a request. It is asking for views about whether the qualifying period can be removed and what benefits this might deliver.However, it does not intend to impose a legal duty on employers to say in job advertisements whether they are open to flexible work.2. Ensuring that the eight business grounds for turning down a request remain validEmployers who turn down a request to work flexibly under the statutory scheme must be able to point to one or more of the business grounds set out in the legislation. The government doesn’t believe that these present a disproportionate barrier to flexible working (they don’t) and doesn’t think that they need to be changed. However, it wants to find out if the existing business reasons are still appropriate.3. Requiring the employer to consider alternativesCurrently, an employer can turn down a request if it has relevant business reason. It doesn’t have to consider alternatives to the one proposed, although, in practice, many employers do. The government wants to explore whether it’s practical to ask employers to set out, when rejecting a request, what alternatives it’s considered (and, if viable, presumably offered to the employee). It believes that asking employers to consider alternatives will help influence organizational norms.4. Reviewing the administrative process underpinning the processCurrently, an employee can make only one statutory request every 12 months and the employer has three months to …

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New Data Privacy Law Will Soon Take Effect in China

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New Data Privacy Law Will Soon Take Effect in China

China’s new data privacy law, the Personal Information Protection Law (PIPL), was passed on Aug. 20 and will go into effect on Nov. 1. It’s the latest in a series of laws designed to protect the personal data of individuals and increase data security in China. Companies, especially multinationals, should make sure they are in compliance with the new law when it goes into effect. “The key takeaway of the Personal Information Protection Law is to lay out the comprehensive framework regarding how companies, both inside China and also outside of China—given its extraterritorial jurisdiction—should collect and process personal data, including also the cross-border transfer of data,” said Todd Liao, an attorney with Morgan Lewis in Shanghai. “It’s a comprehensive legal framework to regulate the processing and collection and cross-border transfer of personal information.”HR Included in New LawUnlike previous iterations of similar laws, Article 13 of the PIPL includes employees and HR management under the scope of protected personal information. This means personal information related to employment and HR, including compensation and performance review information, cannot be sent out of China unless it is anonymized or informed consent has been given by the employee. This has implications for companies that might have a parent company and an HR department based outside of China.”We’ve seen situations where clients are looking to put their regional HR outside of China,” said Lesli Ligorner, an attorney with Morgan Lewis in Beijing and Shanghai. “And now they’re actually thinking, because China is their biggest market with their biggest employee population, that they should put that person in China, because it’s easier to have that person review everything in China than to have that person be external to China.”One way companies can prepare for this change is to update their employee handbooks and consent forms to make sure informed consent is covered in these situations.PIPL vs. GDPRThe PIPL is similar to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in the European Union but differs in important ways. Like the GDPR, the PIPL has broad extraterritorial jurisdiction, so even companies with no presence in China could be affected by the new law if they are collecting data from people who are in China.”Some of the big differences is that GDPR is a little bit more forgiving, in that if the recipient country, for example, has a robust data protection regime, there is the ability to transfer the data without adding in additional protections,” Ligorner said. “China doesn’t have that. … If you are going to send data outside of China, that’s personal data and there are prerequisites before the transfer can legally take place.” One other difference is that the PIPL “doesn’t do a great deal in terms of restricting government access to information,” said Lester Ross, an attorney with WilmerHale in Beijing. “There are clear provisions which state that government departments cannot go beyond their bounds, but there are exceptions for public security and national security, which lack the requirements for warrants found in the United States or other …

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EU and Beyond: Workplace COVID-19 Testing and Vaccination Protocols

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EU and Beyond: Workplace COVID-19 Testing and Vaccination Protocols

​Return-to-office policies were a hot topic this past summer as employers were busy preparing for the fall re-opening of workplaces. The question of the accompanying health-and-safety measures remains a tricky one to deal with for global organizations. This article focuses on testing and vaccination protocols.A lot has happened since April:The EU Green Pass (also called the COVID-19 passport) took effect on time for the summer holiday period.France made vaccination compulsory for health care workers and other categories of workers.The U.S. president called for vaccination to become mandatory in the private sector.Italy is planning to make the Green Pass compulsory to access any workplace.People across Europe and beyond are certainly more relaxed than before the summer when it comes to taking tests, getting vaccines and sharing the related status: most of us did it just to be able to go on holiday (or, in some countries, access a restaurant). But does this mean that global employers can apply a blanket approach, mandating testing or vaccination and asking for status updates? The answer is no. There remain huge variations across regions and countries.As we emphasized in our previous blog posts, an employer’s duty to ensure the health and safety of its workforce often competes with other rules deriving from employment, anti-discrimination and privacy laws, particularly an individual’s right to determine if and when to accept medical treatment, which includes being vaccinated. Therefore, employers cannot—save for where there is a clear local statutory provision mandating vaccinations for some or all of the population—impose vaccination (and in most cases, testing) on their employees.EuropeAt a European level, save for the EU Green Pass, there is still no guidance or legislation to make vaccination mandatory. Vaccination of individuals is thus still voluntary under EU law, but as noted above, the Green Pass has indirectly helped with the vaccination of employees.At a national level, employers will need to navigate the various approaches and regulations. After Italy, France and Greece are the next EU countries to impose employee vaccination (or, in Greece, testing or proof of recovery from COVID-19—see below).In France, since September, several categories of employees (including medical and paramedical professionals working in hospitals, clinics and retirement homes, firefighters, ambulance drivers and more) have been subject to mandatory vaccination. Only those with a proven medical condition are exempt.Mandatory vaccination cannot be imposed on other categories of employee and employers are not allowed to ask about vaccination status. However, if an employee wishes to get vaccinated, the employer must facilitate this, such as by allowing the employee to take time off to get vaccinated during work hours.Besides, employees working in close contact with the public (such as restaurants, movie theaters, buses and trains) are subject to the obligation to present a sanitary pass, which is granted after vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test.Employers must make sure that their employees comply with the obligation to be vaccinated against COVID-19 or to present a sanitary pass when required. Refusal to do so may lead to suspension of the employment contract and remuneration. …

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Required Vaccinations to Replace U.S. COVID-19 Travel Bans

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Required Vaccinations to Replace U.S. COVID-19 Travel Bans

​The Biden administration plans to rescind the COVID-19 travel bans imposed in 2020 and replace them with vaccination and testing requirements to enter the U.S., beginning in November.Claire Nilson, head of the global mobility and immigration team in the London office of Faegre Drinker, explained that since early in the pandemic, travelers who had been in Brazil, China, the European Schengen countries, India, Iran, Ireland, South Africa and the United Kingdom during the preceding 14 days were banned from flying directly into the United States unless they were either a U.S. citizen or green card holder, or they first applied for and received an exception waiver.The Schengen Area countries covered by the COVID-19 ban include Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.The Biden administration’s COVID-19 response coordinator Jeff Zients said that fully vaccinated travelers will need to complete pre-departure testing within three days prior to their departure to the U.S., but that they will not be required to quarantine upon their arrival.He said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will determine the definition of “fully vaccinated” and what vaccines qualify for the policy.”So far, the U.S. government has not clarified what will constitute suitable evidence of vaccination and which COVID-19 vaccines will be recognized beyond the three already authorized in the United States [Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson],” Nilson said.Notably, hundreds of millions of people worldwide received the AstraZeneca vaccine, which has been recognized by the World Health Organization but has not won approval from U.S. regulators. The CDC will also issue a contact tracing order requiring airlines to collect contact information from each U.S.-bound traveler. “This will enable the CDC and state and local public health officials to follow up with inbound travelers and those around them if someone has potentially been exposed to COVID-19,” Zients said.Alka Bahal, a partner in the Morristown, N.J., office of Fox Rothschild, said that it’s not just leisure travelers who are happy with the Biden administration’s announcement; the move will have a significant positive impact on U.S. business immigration.”Many foreign nationals in the U.S. on work visas have remained restricted to the U.S. due to the travel bans, having been unable to visit home due to fears of being unable to return,” Bahal said. “Hopefully, the lifting of the bans will be soon followed by the resumption of normal visa processing at U.S. consulates and embassies worldwide. This will further increase visa processing by enabling foreign nationals who have been unable to obtain their first U.S. work visas to now obtain them and come to the U.S. to work.”For the past 18 months, virtually all visitors from the banned countries have been prohibited from traveling directly to the United States. Some resorted to workarounds such as spending two weeks in an intermediate country like Mexico or the Dominican Republic, before obtaining a negative coronavirus test and then entering the U.S.For foreign …

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Ontario Court Rules Severance Pay Is Based on Global Payroll

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Ontario Court Rules Severance Pay Is Based on Global Payroll

​Ontario’s Divisional Court—a branch of the Superior Court of Justice in Canada’s largest province—unanimously ruled in June that more employers in Ontario will now have to take their global payroll into account in determining an employee’s entitlement to severance pay.According to the Ontario Employment Standards Act 2000 (ESA), employers in the province with a payroll of more than $2.5 million must compensate an employee for the loss of a job with five or more years of service to the company upon termination, explained Hilary Page, a lawyer with SpringLaw in Toronto. In the Hawkes v. Max Aicher (North America) Ltd. case, the Divisional Court overturned an earlier Ontario Labor Relations Board decision that the Can$2.5 million (approximately 1.98 million USD) threshold was limited to an employer’s Ontario payroll.”Prior to the Hawkes decision, employers could take the position that the payroll criteria only applied to payroll within the province of Ontario,” said Darren Avery, an attorney with Filion Wakely Thorup Angeletti LLP in London, Ontario. “This meant an employer could avoid paying severance pay if they only had a small operation in Ontario—and thus a payroll of less than $2.5 million.” The Hawkes decision changed that stance, Avery continued. “The court gave a clear signal it will consider an employer’s global payroll—whether it be from a different province or even a different country—in determining whether the statutory $2.5 million threshold is met.”Under the ESA, a notice of termination caps out at eight weeks, while severance pay can be issued up to 26 weeks, Page said. “Most employees are entitled to more than the amounts in the Employment Standards Act,” said Stephen Wolpert, an attorney with Whitten & Lublin in Toronto.Employers now need to reconsider their obligations when firing employees, Wolpert stated. The court decision will also increase termination and severance costs for many employers in Ontario.”As a result, some larger companies who had small operations and small payrolls in Ontario may have previously thought they were exempt from paying statutory severance pay,” Wolpert added. “Now it is clear that they will not be exempt.”Case BackgroundThe plaintiff worked for a Hamilton, Ontario-based subsidiary of European steel company Max Aicher until 2015 when his employment was terminated without cause.Fired employees have long been entitled to various protections under Ontario’s ESA, Wolpert stated.The plaintiff then filed a complaint with Ontario’s Ministry of Labor, claiming he was entitled to termination pay, vacation pay and severance pay based on Max Aicher’s global payroll. The Germany-based manufacturer’s global payroll far exceeds $2.5 million, Page noted.  Initially, an employment standards officer reviewed the claim in 2017, granting the employee termination and vacation pay. The officer also determined the plaintiff was not entitled to severance pay because his former employer did not have a payroll of at least $2.5 million in Ontario. The Ontario Labor Relations Board agreed with the employment standards officer’s decision in 2018, reiterating that payroll for the purposes of severance pay under the ESA was limited to an employer’s Ontario payroll. The plaintiff then appealed this decision.”The road to this decision was long,” Page said. …

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Report: First Year with Employer Critical for LGBTQ+ Employees

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Report: First Year with Employer Critical for LGBTQ+ Employees

​Newly hired employees who identify as LGBTQ+ typically will come out during their first year at an organization or not at all, according to a new global report.”For most LGBTQ+ people, the first year in a new job is critical in the coming-out journey,” Boston Consulting Group (BCG) researchers noted in Why the First Year Matters for LGBTQ+ Employees.Across the countries surveyed, an average of 70 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents said they came out during the hiring process or within the first 12 months of starting their job. After the first year with the employer, only 10 percent came out and the other 20 percent never disclosed their identity as an LGBTQ+ individual.”We observed this broad trend across most of the countries we surveyed, except in India and China, where employees in general took longer to come out or chose to stay closeted: just 36 percent and 56 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents in India and China, respectively, said that they had come out by the end of their first year at work,” the researchers wrote.The findings are based on a global survey of 8,800 people who worked in corporate settings and have high levels of education. Respondents were from Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Mexico, The Netherlands, Norway, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the U.K. and the U.S.Almost two-thirds (61 percent) of respondents identified as LGBTQ+, and the survey was skewed toward those working for companies with relatively advanced LGBTQ+ policies and programs, according to the report. Most respondents (88 percent) were between the ages of 18 and 44. CREATE LASTING IMPACT IN THE WORKPLACEJoin us at the SHRM INCLUSION 2021 conference Oct. 25-27 in Austin, Texas, for three engaging days of learning and networking. You will get the tools, best practices and actionable solutions you need to build a more diverse, equitable and inclusive workplace. Register Now Coming out is not a singular event, the researchers noted, but “a journey defined by daily decisions and interactions. It can include coming out to colleagues or clients.”Even after making the initial leap to share their identity at work, many LGBTQ+ individuals choose to cover up that information at times,” they wrote. About one-fourth of respondents who described themselves as mostly out at work “said that they would on occasion lie, omit details, or avoid answering questions about their sexual orientation.”About half of the respondents who were not out at work said they did not plan to come out, with more than 63 percent saying their sexuality and gender identity is a private matter.Deena Fidas thinks those who cite privacy as a reason for avoiding disclosure do so because they likely experienced negative consequences elsewhere. She is managing director and chief program and partnerships officer at Out & Equal, headquartered in San Francisco. The organization works exclusively on LGBTQ+ workplace equality through its global programs and Fortune 500 partnerships.”When LGBTQ+ people say it’s nobody’s business, it’s because they faced discrimination,” she said. “The vast majority of …

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