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September Hiring Comes In Well Under Expectations

September Hiring Comes In Well Under Expectations

​U.S. employers added a disappointing 194,000 new jobs in September, with hiring in leisure and hospitality leading the way, according to the latest employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The unemployment rate dropped to 4.8 percent from 5.2 percent in August. Economists had forecast that employers added about 500,000 new jobs last month.The report reflects nine consecutive months of payroll gains, but hiring has fallen sharply in August and September and total employment is still below pre-pandemic levels. Economists believe that the rate of job growth this year would likely have been higher if not for the COVID-19 delta variant slowing hiring activity.Difficulty finding workers to fill open jobs continues to hold back hiring as well. Evidence shows that many employers are increasingly desperate to hire, offering higher pay, signing bonuses and more flexible working hours to attract applicants, a shift in power that has given job seekers the upper hand in the recruitment process. …

Should Job Seekers Disclose Their Vaccination Status Upfront?

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Should Job Seekers Disclose Their Vaccination Status Upfront?

​As more companies consider establishing a vaccine mandate, a trend is taking shape: Job seekers are promoting themselves as “Fully Vaccinated” on applications, resumes and their LinkedIn profiles to stand out.  Some experts are beginning to say that vaccination status is a must-have line item on resumes and LinkedIn profiles as employers prepare for regulations that limit hiring to people who have been vaccinated.The Biden administration in September issued a mandate for federal workers and government contractors to be vaccinated by later this year, and a forthcoming Occupational Safety and Health Administration rule will require employers with over 100 employees to get their workforce vaccinated or undergo at least weekly COVID-19 testing. In addition, data from job search sites shows an uptick in job postings that seek fully vaccinated candidates as a condition of employment. As of Aug. 30, the share of job listings requiring vaccinations has soared on Indeed, with job postings per million requiring vaccination up 242 percent from a month earlier. More than 50,000 new job postings on job search site Adzuna require COVID-19 vaccination, up from 35,000 in July and 2,300 in January, with positions in health care, hospitality and information technology the most likely to require vaccine disclosures.Thus, for job seekers, letting potential employers know upfront that they are vaccinated could mean the difference between getting a recruiter’s attention or not. In an August survey of 1,250 hiring managers, nearly 70 percent said they were more likely to hire somebody who indicates on their resume that they are fully vaccinated, according to ResumeBuilder.com, a resume-creation tool based in San Francisco, which commissioned the poll. A third of hiring managers surveyed said they were automatically eliminating resumes that don’t include vaccine status.One reason employers with vaccine mandates may favor candidates who lead with their vaccine status in the application stage is that it completes an important step in the screening process. “Vaccination status will certainly be a factor to hiring managers,” said Andrew Challenger, senior vice president of global outplacement at executive coaching firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas in Chicago. “If they already know you are vaccinated, they can check off that question and will not need to worry about getting that candidate tested every week. It will speed up the hiring process if the HR department already knows in which bucket the candidate goes.”Challenger said it is likely that, in most cases, vaccinated candidates will have an edge over their unvaccinated competition. “In other cases, it depends on the ideology of the hiring manager and the company’s culture overall,” he noted. “Certainly, there are reasonable exemptions that hiring managers will take into account, but generally, at this point, a vaccinated candidate will require less work from a company.”Carolyn Kleiman, a career coach, resume consultant at ResumeBuilder.com, and senior career counselor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., warns that screening out resumes just because they don’t include vaccination status may have negative consequences.”Employers could be losing out on qualified candidates if they use that as a screener, as …

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USCIS Proposes Redo for DACA Program

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USCIS Proposes Redo for DACA Program

​The long-beleaguered Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA)—originally created by a policy memo in 2012—will be reestablished through regulation, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced.USCIS issued the proposed rule Sept. 28 and is allowing for a 60-day public-comment period. DACA protects over 600,000 young immigrants, known as Dreamers, from deportation and provides them work authorization. The program has been embroiled in a yearslong battle over its legality and is currently in limbo after a federal judge in Texas found it to be unlawful in July. The proposed rule aims to address the judge’s concerns, but mainly would codify the existing DACA policy. The program would carry the same eligibility criteria, including that individuals must have arrived in the U.S. before their 16th birthday; been born on or after June 16, 1981; have continuously resided in the U.S. since June 15, 2007; are currently in school or have graduated or honorably served in the military; have not been convicted of a felony; and do not pose a threat to national security or public safety.The program would continue to grant two years of deportation protection and a two-year work permit for a $495 fee. And recipients could leave the country under a program known as advance parole, which gives them permission to return.Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy counsel at the American Immigration Council, an advocacy group in Washington, D.C., explained that the proposal creates formal regulatory language for granting DACA requests, and for removing someone from the program.The proposed rule also attempts to address some of the concerns raised by U.S. District Judge Andrew Hanen, of the Southern District of Texas. DACA applicants could decide to pay a lower fee of $85 to only receive deportation protection without an accompanying work permit, which has been one of the more controversial aspects of the program.”The regulation makes work authorization no longer a ‘part of’ DACA—but still available,” Reichlin-Melnick said. “The regulation would sever deferred action from automatic employment authorization, allowing applicants to apply for just DACA if they wanted, without the work permit. USCIS is basically recognizing that the work permit portion of DACA could potentially be struck down, and saying that they think if that happens, they may still be able to protect people with DACA from being arrested and deported.” The proposed rule would not change the validity of anyone’s current DACA work authorization.”Today, there are more than 400,000 DACA recipients currently working in the United States—over half are essential workers and 41,700 are in health care,” said Candy Marshall, president of TheDream.US, a college and career success organization for undocumented students.”Codifying the DACA program will enable employers across the country to retain current employees and to access this growing talent pool as they seek to rebuild after the pandemic,” said Marshall, formerly the chief human resources officer at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.Congressional FixJudge Hanen concluded that the Obama administration circumvented procedural requirements when initially implementing the DACA program via agency memo, rather than going through the formal regulatory process. …

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