Home » Archives by category » HR Careers
Ask HR: How Can Restaurant Owners Attract and Keep Good Workers?

Ask HR: How Can Restaurant Owners Attract and Keep Good Workers?

​SHRM President and Chief Executive Officer Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., SHRM-SCP, is answering HR questions as part of a series for USA Today.Do you have an HR or work-related question you’d like him to answer? Submit it here.As a restaurant owner, I have struggled to maintain staff since the COVID-19 pandemic hit. In the past, I have tended to hire minimum wage workers. Should I raise wages to keep my best workers? What else can I offer besides cash to attract and keep good workers? —Wendell Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.: In a “normal” environment, finding and keeping good employees is challenging. Doing so during a pandemic and in a labor-intensive, public-facing industry is an even greater feat. But before raising salaries, take a moment to assess your circumstances from a broader perspective. A recent survey highlights some of the steps employers are taking to attract and retain workers in today’s ultracompetitive talent market:57 percent are offering referral bonuses.55 percent are hiring external or temporary workers.44 percent are upskilling and reskilling staff.43 percent are boosting pay.Referral bonuses incentivize your current employees while providing businesses with quality leads to other good workers. Hiring external or temporary workers can be a short-term solution to attract workers not yet ready or available for a long-term commitment. Since much learning on the job occurs through trial and error, it may be helpful and meaningful for your more experienced staff to mentor new and less-experienced workers. Having a structured mentorship program can help guide and teach new and less-experienced workers the ropes of the business, particularly for those who are looking to progress in a hospitality or culinary career. Supporting worker training and offering tuition reimbursement could also help with upskilling or reskilling staff. Consider partnering with local culinary institutes and colleges to highlight available training and education. Tuition reimbursement programs often require employees to attain a certain grade and remain with the employer for a specified term after completion of the training or degree. Enhancing health and safety protocols can help alleviate workers’ COVID-19 health concerns. Offering paid sick leave can reduce pressure on workers to earn money when they feel ill. It can also help minimize workplace transmission of viruses. Taking additional steps to supply personal protection equipment helps staff and guests adhere to safety protocols. You are intimately familiar with how COVID-19 has impacted your business. You may be less familiar, however, with how COVID-19 has complicated workers’ lives. For many workers, the upending of schooling, health care and transportation has intensified competing demands on their time and jeopardized their livelihoods. In response, many employees are seeking greater flexibility in their work. In a real sense, employees are your first customers. How you accommodate them translates to the service they provide your guests. Don’t underestimate the impact of workplace culture. Workers tend to thrive in workplace cultures that match their values and personas. Before you commit to making investments that will impact your bottom line, remember it doesn’t cost anything to listen. Be flexible with …

How Content and Structure Improve Resume Readability

Comments Off on How Content and Structure Improve Resume Readability
How Content and Structure Improve Resume Readability

To be found in resume databases, your resume must be data-dense—packed with content that is relevant to your target job. Further, it needs to be organized so an overworked recruiter can easily scan and read it once it is discovered by the database software. So this is where we take all the research you’ve done and create a resume that will support database discoverability, readability and comprehension.Start your resume with information about your professional skills to show that you are a logical choice to fill this position. Further down in the document, you will detail your skills and professional experience to support your application for the job while increasing data density and discoverability in the resume.Resume Structure and FlowYour resume should follow a logical flow in much the same way a news article is written. News articles include a headline, which acts like a signpost to tell the reader, succinctly, the article’s biggest takeaway. The first paragraph draws the reader in with the major facts of the story. Subheads throughout the article alert the reader to new facts. This structure makes understanding your article—or resume—much easier and demonstrates your written communication skills.Download the TemplateReadabilityIf you follow a structure that makes the document easily read by the recruiter, you greatly increase the odds of that first, quick scan becoming a careful read and then turning into a telephone and face-to-face interview.We’ve provided a resume template that spells out the headlines and subheads you can use, as well the kind of information that should be included in each section. These combine to make a resume discoverable and readable.Best-selling author Martin Yate, a career coach and former HR professional, takes your questions each week about how to further your career in HR.  From big issues to small, please feel free to e-mail your queries to YourCareerQA@shrm.org. We’ll only publish your first name and city, unless you prefer to remain anonymous—just let us know. …

Continue reading …

Ask HR: How Can Older Workers Better Compete for Jobs?

Comments Off on Ask HR: How Can Older Workers Better Compete for Jobs?
Ask HR: How Can Older Workers Better Compete for Jobs?

SHRM President and Chief Executive Officer Johnny C. Taylor, Jr., SHRM-SCP, is answering HR questions as part of a series for USA Today.Do you have an HR or work-related question you’d like him to answer? Submit it here. As an older worker, I tend to see greater focus in my industry on hiring younger, less experienced, less expensive talent. How can I market myself to better compete with younger workers? —Jean Johnny C. Taylor, Jr.: For a seasoned worker, the job search may seem frustrating and overwhelming given the competition in the labor market. But if you really look at it, ageism runs counter to employers’ efforts to retain good workers and build institutional knowledge. To break through the sea of preconceived notions surrounding older workers, you must first understand your full value. There are several approaches you can utilize to market your value and contrast your skill set against younger, less experienced workers: Educate yourself. Many younger candidates have shiny new degrees that can look enticing to prospective employers. However, this doesn’t mean you need to go back to school full time. Consider pursuing a certification relevant in your field. For many, a robust offering of courses is conveniently accessible online. Demonstrating a commitment to continuous learning tells prospective employers you are open to growth and pairs well with your extensive experience to broaden your appeal. Showcase your proficiency with relevant technology. Employers are searching for candidates who can leverage cutting-edge technology to enhance performance. Highlight how you’ve embraced innovation in your career to achieve success. Be flexible. The workplace is constantly evolving. Consequently, employers are seeking employees who collaborate with others, take on tasks outside of their job descriptions and are flexible with work location. Articulate your flexibility on your resume—including work outside your normal scope and team projects—and provide examples during the interview as well. Network with other professionals in your field. By sheer volume of experience, older workers have generated far more business contacts in their careers. Connect with those individuals who know you best to discover what available opportunities might be a good fit. Often, those are the people who are the most willing to give you a professional endorsement and advocate for you. Networking can be a great opportunity to further expand your professional network. Highlight your soft skills. Your experience has given you the opportunity to develop a range of coveted soft skills that workers early in their careers simply do not have. Critical thinking, organization, innovation, teamwork, leadership and interpersonal communication skills are vital to business operations and transcend technical skills. These intangibles give you a distinct advantage over less experienced candidates.Ultimately, employers want a diverse workforce that includes workers from multiple generations. You can show a company how your knowledge, skills and experience are an advantage by adapting your approach using these strategies.I am considering recommending my boyfriend for a position at my workplace. Should I be concerned about creating an inappropriate work relationship? What if he is in a different department? …

Continue reading …

Font and Font Size Matter in Your Resume

Comments Off on Font and Font Size Matter in Your Resume
Font and Font Size Matter in Your Resume

​So much about a resume’s effectiveness comes down to readability. Make sure your chosen font never distracts from the message. The six fonts that will make your resume readily readable and look most professional are:Helvetica                                     CalibriCambria                                                      Garamond Arial                                             DidotWe discussed how each of these fonts have subtle differences, often related to how a font performs in different sizes. All of these fonts are good choices for your resume and other career management communications (choose one and stick with it; your consistency will impress readers). However, all fonts do not look good in all sizes. Some are stronger when the size of the print must be small, and some are better when a larger size is required. This could be confusing, but there is an important consideration that will make things easier: Forget the “rule” that resumes can be only one or two pages long; it’s outdated and irrelevant today. The idea that someone who is drawn in by the first two pages of your resume will refuse to talk to you because you have a third page of relevant experience is patently absurd. Professional jobs have become more complex, and this naturally requires more explanation and, therefore, space. When writing your resume, don’t worry about fonts and sizing; concentrate on the content. Once you have captured the story that positions you as the perfect candidate for a specific job, pick your font and size. The six fonts above look good and read well at 12 points, which is a nice size for a resume. Scale them down to 10 points and they all become more difficult to read. Don’t go below 10.5 points. Make life easier for recruiters and hiring managers by making your resume as visually accessible as you can.To do this, you need to find a balance between two conflicting considerations:More white space on the page makes your resume more readable.Larger font sizes are easier to read but eat into the white space. Look for the ideal balance of font and font size and how they change white space and readability. Create several versions of your resume with a combination of fonts and font sizes so you can compare them. For example, compare Garamond and Arial in the 12-point font size, and you’ll see that Arial is almost twice as big.  The TakeawayYour customer, in this case your prospective employer, always comes first, so make sure your resume is easy to read.The rule about one- and two-page resumes is no longer valid. Tell the story, make it readable, and edit it as tightly as you can.Font and font size are the vehicles that share your message with recruiters and hiring managers. The right combination of font and font size ensures that nothing comes between your message and the reader, so try different combinations. Always remember that your goal is to make your resume as visually accessible and easy to read as possible. Each of the fonts listed above will deliver on that goal. Best-selling author Martin Yate, a career coach and former HR professional, takes your …

Continue reading …

How Networking Speeds Your Job Search

Comments Off on How Networking Speeds Your Job Search
How Networking Speeds Your Job Search

Bestselling author Martin Yate, a career coach and former HR professional, takes your questions each week about how to further your career in HR. Contact him at the e-mail address at the end of this column.If there’s a bit of career advice you’ve heard over and over, it’s that networking is the best way to get a job. But what we seldom hear is exactly how to network.Networking isn’t just about knowing people. The value lies in who those people are, what you hope to gain from a relationship with them and what you intend to offer them in return. No matter how early it might be in your career, think about and decide where you want your career to go, then work backwards to identify the stepping stones you’ll need to get to that goal.You can know influential people in your profession, but the relationship you have with them is what’s important. And you can’t build those relationships without meaningful conversations moving those relationships forward.Consequently, the people who land the best opportunities fastest and with greatest ease do so because they have built solid professional relationships that are based on knowing, learning from and helping those people who can best influence their careers. Their resumes can reflect these relationships.Your Resume Powers Your Social Media PresenceManaging your professional networks with a robust and properly focused social media presence is one of the most powerful methods for managing your career destiny. Your social media presence represents how you think of yourself as a professional and how you present yourself to your working world.Defining your professional persona starts with writing the right resume. Your resume will form the basis not only of your job hunts but also the social media presence through which you become known to your professional community. In building your resume, don’t try to make yourself the perfect choice for multiple jobs. When you try to squeeze all the things you can do into one resume, the resulting resume will lack focus and will be found less frequently in recruiters’ resume database searches. Focusing on one job (or sometimes two very closely related jobs) will make your resume dense in the necessary keywords necessary to be discovered in database searches. Your social media profile should reflect much the same information. The Best Networking ContactsNetworking is more than just knowing people; it’s developing mutually beneficial relationships. These are the types of people who can be of most value in your professional network:Anyone who works in your profession is a good contact, but of greater value are people who work in either your particular area of responsibility or an area of expertise that your job interacts with on a regular basis.Even better potential networking colleagues are people who,work in your specialty or one closely related to it and who hold job titles one, two or three levels above yours. These are the people most likely to be involved in hiring someone like you.You can meet all these people at local SHRM chapter meetings and in online groups. With online groups you can, of course, reach out and ask to …

Continue reading …