Home » Archives by category » Article (Page 2)

Online youth engagement to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Comments Off on Online youth engagement to prevent the spread of COVID-19

Fadllil Kaafi manages the web seminars from his home due to the lockdown Thursdays have become an important day for Fadllil Kaafi, 27 years old, since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak in Indonesia in February 2020. The youngest member of the Indonesian Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Council (DK3N) under the Ministry of Manpower has been managing and organizing a weekly online interactive talkshow on issues related to OSH and COVID-19 every Thursday. The interactive talkshow titled “Hangout Online with DK3N” or also known as GO DK3N has been livestreamed since end of March, reaching out to young Indonesians. The participation of Indonesian youth in taking necessary steps to protect themselves and their families, support their communities and prevent the spread of the outbreak is crucial. About half of the 130 million population is under the age of 30.“When the outbreak just started, together with senior members of DK3N, we were thinking out loud what we could do to help mitigating the spread of the COVID-19,” said Fadllil. “What was the best way to reach out to young people and empower them? Of course, social media.”Engaging young people to prevent the spread of COVID-19 Fadllil shared his works in promoting OSH for young people at the SafeYouth@Work tripartite results and sustainable workshop at the ILO’s International Training Center in Turin, Italy OSH is not a new issue for Fadllil. It was his university major when he got selected to attend the ILO’s SafeYouth@Work Congress during the XXI World Congress on Safety and Health at Work in Singapore in 2017 along with 124 other youth champions from 29 countries around the world. As an OSH youth champion, he has been active raising youth awareness on the issue of safety and health at work, including through an online OSH platform and a game board OSHNopoly. During the question and answer session, they were enthusiasts and stayed until the end of the session. Our hard work and days of working late really paid off.” Fadllil Kaafi When he started to work at DK3N last January 2020, he launched an initiative using digital platforms and social media to engage young people on the issue of safety and health at work.“I was nervous because this was also the first initiative from DK3N to engage young people. The organization was considered a formal governmental institution that mostly work with companies, unions, government institutions, experts and so forth,” he said.On the day of the first interactive talkshow, the responses were beyond his expectation. More than 170 young participants registered with more than 300 views. “During the question and answer session, they were enthusiasts and stayed until the end of the session. Our hard work and days of working late really paid off,” told Fadllil who has been managing and organizing the talkshows from his home due to the lockdown. Posters of web seminars, including the World OSH Day seminar Since then, the interactive talkshows live every Thursday, presenting various speakers from OSH experts and safety and health officers. The topics raised also varies from myths and facts of COVID-19, practical information about disinfectant and sterilization as well as the roles of youth in the COVID-19 pandemic. The talkshow also focussed on how to work effectively and safely in the construction sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. To date, the construction sector employs more than 8 million workers, a large proportion of whom are young workers.After four weeks, GO DK3N has reached about 3000 viewers. And the number is increasingRecognizing the important role of youth “We need more young people involved in OSH related issues and be part of the organization like DK3N. Young people’s inspirational vision can bring innovative ideas on how to better promote OSH and reach out to wider audiences using technology, particularly during a crisis like this,” said Dr Ghazmahadi, Director of OSH Inspection of the Ministry of Manpower. Young people’s inspirational vision can bring innovative ideas on how to better promote OSH and reach out to wider audiences using technology, particularly during a crisis like this.” Dr Ghazmahadi, Director of OSH Inspection of the Ministry of Manpower He added that the involvement of young people could further encourage other youth to apply OSH practices from an early age. “As a result, they will have a good OSH awareness when entering the world of work and, in turn, can promote the culture of prevention at the workplace.” Information and knowledge are key to eliminate the COVID-19 crisis. Thanks to Fadllil work more young people protect themselves and their families, and contribute to prevent the spread of the COVID-19.” Michiko Miyamoto, Country Director of the ILO in Indonesia Similarly Michiko Miyamoto, Country Director of the ILO in Indonesia, appraised the commitment shown by Fadlil as one of the ILO’s OSH youth champions to consistently promoting OSH related issues to Indonesian young people and the public at large.“Information and knowledge are key to eliminate the COVID-19 crisis. Thanks to Fadllil work more young people protect themselves and their families, and contribute to prevent the spread of the COVID-19.,” she stated.Meanwhile, in the midst of his weekly programme, Fadllil who is now finishing his graduate study has a bigger goal: “I just hope that culture of prevention will be part of youth’s daily culture and OSH is part of our every day’s routines as we tend to take actions only after bad incidents or accidents occur,” he concluded.

Continue reading …

Seafarers and fishers: Providing vital services during the COVID-19 pandemic

Comments Off on Seafarers and fishers: Providing vital services during the COVID-19 pandemic

Corinne Vargha, Director, ILO International Labour Standards Department, and Alette van Leur, Director, ILO Sectoral Policies Department

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented situation worldwide. To slow the spread of the disease and lessen its impact, governments around the globe have restricted travel and closed borders. Numerous ports and airports have shut, ships denied entry and planes grounded.About 90 per cent of global trade is moved by maritime transport thanks to the work of the world’s two million seafarers. In addition, commercial fishing is a major source of the world’s food. Many seafarers are on board for extended periods of time so to avoid fatigue, crews need to change on a regular basis. This involves some 100,000 seafarers every month. However, because of restrictions due to the COVID-19 pandemic, around 90,000 seafarers are currently stuck on board cruise ships without passengers and sometimes even without pay. A similar number have been forced to stay on-board commercial ships for much longer than their planned period of service. According to claims received by the ILO, numerous seafarers in need of immediate medical care ashore have not been allowed to disembark at many ports around the world. Seafarers and fishers on board are effectively stranded. Meanwhile those waiting to return to sea have often lost their source of income. © International Maritime Organization The ILO is calling on governments to adopt without delay all possible measures to facilitate crew changes and the repatriation of seafarers and fishers, while taking steps to minimize the risk of contagion. The protection of seafarers’ and fishers’ safety and health must remain a priority during the pandemic.The Maritime Labour Convention, 2006, has proved to be a strong and practical instrument that has supported both seafarers and ship owners during this pandemic.As seafarers and ship owners are looking to the Convention for protection the ILO has therefore issued an Information note providing advice on its implementation in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It has also issued a sectoral brief on COVID-19 and maritime & fishing. The ILO is also joining forces with the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) and the International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF) to develop and implement a global coordinated response to the problems created by the outbreak of COVID-19 in the maritime sector.By Corinne Vargha, Director, ILO International Labour Standards Department and Alette van Leur, Director, ILO Sectoral Policies Department

Continue reading …

COVID-19 and the new meaning of safety and health at work

Comments Off on COVID-19 and the new meaning of safety and health at work
Continue reading …

The COVID-19 crisis may lead to mental health issues for many workers

Comments Off on The COVID-19 crisis may lead to mental health issues for many workers

Lode Godderis, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Belgium
We need to be aware of the long-term consequences on the health of all workers. One can expect a drop out of personnel, not only due to infections with COVID-19, but also due to stress, frustration and isolation.
Big health inequities due to pandemic and economic recession are to be expected. For white coat workers, it will be mainly the mental health toll as a result of the high work load during the crisis. For white collar workers, their mental health will instead suffer from the effects of isolation and quarantine. Finally, for blue collar workers, job insecurity and loss of income could lead to mental health issues.
However, it is possible to turn the tide. If we reflect on previous pandemics followed by an economic recession it becomes clear that countries that invest in social protection, support programs and provide sufficient employment opportunities can mitigate the mental health crisis that follows a pandemic.
The overworked white coat workers will need time to recover from this period at the same time that healthcare services will be pushing for a return to normal operational levels. For people who worked remotely from home during the crisis, it will be important for them to mentally prepare to return to work. This group of people might be wary about returning to work, fearing an increased risk of infection but also uncertain about the future of their job. The final group of workers concerns a large population of people that have already lost their job, are working reduced hours or are facing severe cuts in their wages.
Nathan Laine / Hans Lucas AFP
Recessions typically exacerbate pre-existing health inequities and have a larger impact on the health of vulnerable disadvantaged groups, such as people with disabilities and diseases and the unemployed. For these workers, we must take extra supportive measures to ensure these populations can resume their roles in society and avoid severe financial or mental health consequences.
So far, pandemic planning has not sufficiently addressed these underlying inequalities and social determinants. However, if we can take advantage of the extraordinary wave of solidarity that we are experiencing in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the impact of the economic recession might have an unexpected positive impact on our health. This cannot happen without appropriate measures to avoid health inequities.
Governments should develop plans to reduce the gaps in disease burdens both nationally as well as internationally. Efforts should be mainly focussed on the lower social class workers, where measures can yield larger reductions in diseases. International collaboration is also necessary to support low- and lower-middle-income countries in which a large proportion of the citizens are poor.
The presence or absence of supportive policies that target social inequities will dictate the course to financial and mental health security following the COVID-19 crisis. This means that despite a recession, the creation or maintenance of safe jobs will ultimately minimize the impact on health of the workers post-corona.
By Lode Godderis, Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Belgium

This is an extract of an article commissioned to mark World Day for Safety and Health at Work.
See here for the full blog and the contributions of other Occupational and Safety and Health Experts:

Continue reading …

Are there enough health workers?

Comments Off on Are there enough health workers?
Continue reading …
Page 2 of 212