Offshore Outsourcing Firms Are Top 10 Users Of H-1B Guest Worker Program

 

Immigration yield for top 10 H-1B employers, fiscal 2012

Rank
Employer
Approved initial I-129 petitions for H-1B
PERM applications for H-1B workers
Immigration yield
Significant offshoring*
1 Cognizant 9,281 669 7% X
2 Tata 7,469 4 0% X
3 Infosys 5,600 21 0% X
4 Wipro 4,304 30 1% X
5 Accenture 4,037 8 0% X
6 HCL America 2,070 44 2% X
7 Tech Mahindra SATYAM 1,963 20 1% X
8 IBM & IBM India 1,846 96 5% X
9 Larsen & Toubro 1,932 15 1% X
10 Deloitte 1,668 260 16% X

* A significant component of this company’s business model is offshore outsourcing.

Source: Author’s analysis of PERM Disclosure Data, Office of Foreign Labor Certification, Department of Labor, fiscal 2012; and I-129 data by employer, USCIS, fiscal 2012

From the Economic Policy Institute comes this analysis of the use of H-1B visas to bring employees to the United States by offshore outsourcing firms.

These major offshore outsourcing firms, most based in India, use H1-B visas to bring highly skilled technical workers to the U.S., often at pay rates lower than American workers.

By RON HIRA, Economic Policy Institute—The H-1B ‘non-immigrant’ temporary foreign guest worker program is called a valuable tool for employers to attract and retain the “best and brightest” immigrants in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields.

Because employers may petition for permanent residence for their H-1B employees, the visa is sometimes described as a “bridge to immigration” that will keep the smartest foreign STEM workers in the U.S. permanently and thus improve the nation’s competitiveness.

In part that’s how Senators Hatch, Rubio, Coons and Klobuchar explain their new bill – known as the “I-Squared Act” – that would more than quadruple the size of the H-1B program.

However, for the biggest users of the program, this view is false: In 2012, the 10 employers receiving the largest number of H-1B visas were all in the business of outsourcing and offshoring high-tech American jobs.

Many of the jobs that went to H-1B workers should have instead gone to U.S. workers, but employers are not required to recruit them before applying for an H-1B, and can even replace their U.S. workers with H-1Bs.

The top 10 H-1B employers were granted an astonishing 40,170 visas; nearly half the total annual quota.

The table also shows each firm’s immigration yield: the ratio of permanent residence applications to new H-1B petitions for these companies. It is evidence of the companies’ intention to hire and keep their H-1B workers in the country permanently.

There are two reasons these firms hire H-1Bs instead of Americans: 1) an H-1B worker can legally be paid less than a U.S. worker in the same occupation and locality; and 2) the H-1B worker learns the job and then rotates back to the home country and takes the work with him.

That’s why the H-1B was dubbed the “Outsourcing Visa” by the former Commerce Minister of India, Kamal Nath.

Rather than keeping jobs from leaving our shores, the H-1B does the opposite, by facilitating offshoring and providing employers with cheap, temporary labor – while reducing job opportunities for American high-tech workers in the process.

The I-Squared Act does nothing to protect against this, while vastly expanding the size of a deeply flawed program that accelerates the offshoring of American high-tech jobs and reduces America’s future capacity to innovate.

The full list of H-1B employers for 2012 is available from ComputerWorld.

http://www.epi.org/blog/top-10-h1b-guestworker-offshore-outsourcing/

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